Pursuit of Truthiness

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Archive for the ‘Entrepreneurship’ Category

The ACA and Entrepreneurship

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In a newly published paperDhaval Dave and I tried to assess how the Affordable Care Act affected entrepreneurship. Many people have been speculating about this, but very few have actually tried to measure it. Part of the reason for this is that the appropriate data only recently became available; most earlier work, including my dissertation, had to focus on the relatively minor parts of the ACA that started earlier, while the biggest provisions didn’t kick in until 2014.

So, did the ACA help or hinder entrepreneurship? In short, it probably helped, but with huge heterogeneity. In our paper we compare entrepreneurship rates for people in their early 60’s (who might benefit from the availability of individual insurance through the ACA) with a “control group” of people in their late 60’s (who are eligible for Medicare and presumably less affected by the ACA). We find that the ACA led to a 3-4% increase in self-employment for people in their early 60’s.

So, should we take that estimate and extrapolate it to everyone, and use that to imply that the ACA created a million businesses? I don’t think so. I expect that the biggest positive effect of the ACA was for exactly the group we studied- people in their early ’60s. Both because they are old enough to have substantial average health costs and health insurance premiums  (so they will factor health insurance into their decisions more strongly than younger people) and because of the community rating provisions of the ACA (which generally reduced individual premiums for older people while raising them for younger people). The other new papers on the ACA and entrepreneurship use identification strategies that let them study adults of most ages, and they generally find no effect or smaller positive effects.

If I do more work on the ACA specifically, it will be to probe the effects on other subgroups that I expect to have particularly positive effects (e.g. less healthy people) or negative effects (e..g young, health people). Alternatively, we can start to look to post-ACA data and assess to what extent entrepreneurship lock remains a problem even after the full ACA implementation.

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Written by James Bailey

September 25, 2018 at 2:04 pm

Shoe Dog: Founding Nike

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Many people recommended Phil Knight’s memoir about starting Nike; I found it entertaining and surprising. At first it seemed more like a cross between The Graduate and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance than a business book.

It turns out that Knight didn’t set out to make Nikes, but rather to import existing shoe brands from Japan back in the 1960’s when Japan was a low-wage country. He had that idea in an entrepreneurship class at Stanford; his class project on it got an A, unlike every other business I’ve heard of that started in a classroom.

Knight says that he wasn’t a natural entrepreneur or CEO, and was terrible at sales and negotiating. So many of the key moves on the way to Nike becoming a multi-billion dollar company seem like blind luck. They only started making their own shoes 7 years into the business, then called Blue Ribbon Sports, after their Japanese supplier threatened to cut them off. A lot of key steps were taken by the first full-time employee, Johnson, without Knight’s knowledge or only after Johnson spent weeks persuading Knight- running their first ad, opening their first retail store, the very name Nike (Knight wanted to call the new shoes “Dimension 6”).

While I always saw Nike as driven by marketing and branding, the early executive team was made up almost entirely of accountants and lawyers; Knight actually worked elsewhere full time as an accountant and accounting professor through the early years of the company. Nike also seems to have driven a lot of true innovation in the shoes, much of it coming from co-founder Bill Bowerman (Knight’s college track coach).

I read this immediately after The Hard Thing About Hard Things, Ben Horowitz’ book about founding a tech company that sold for a billion dollars, and saw a lot of commonalities. Both founders thought they weren’t natural CEO’s, made lots of mistakes, and spent much of their time under extreme stress, convinced the business was within weeks of failure. To some people this might seem like encouragement to start a business (if they succeeded without knowing what they were doing, maybe you could too) but to me it was another indication that I’d never want to run a large business even if I were good at it (which I wouldn’t be). I always thought that the initial startup would be the most precarious time, but once you had millions in revenue and dozens of employees you’d feel more secure, like the business had made it and would be sticking around. In fact the existential crises seem to keep coming- key partners pulling away, new competitors emerging, a lawsuit, a threatening letter from the government, financiers cutting you off or making demands.

Another commonality was the importance of personal relationships within the company and with key customers and suppliers. Knight makes it sound like his executive team were his closest friends, drinking together every night. Any time one big company is doing a deal with another big company, there is usually one person on each side who is the key decision-maker, so it makes sense that they spend time together face-to-face. In Nike’s case, this meant lots of travel between Japan and the US. In Horowitz’ case, this meant spending $6 million while in a cash crunch to buy another company so that they could give away its software free to make that one guy (who from the outside was only a mid-level executive and not the obvious person to deal with) happy.

Both thought vulgarity and management not taking themselves seriously were important. “How many multimillion dollar companies can you yell out “Hey, Buttface” and the entire management team turns around?”

For Knight, a key to success was finding a cause he believed in, so that work didn’t feel like work:

Driving back to Portland I’d puzzle over my sudden success at selling. I’d been unable to sell encyclopedias, and I’d despised it to boot. I’d been slightly better at selling mutual funds, but I’d felt dead inside. So why was selling shoes so different? Because, I realized, it wasn’t selling. I believed in running. I believed that if people got out and ran a few miles every day, the world would be a better place, and I believed these shoes were better to run in. People, sensing my belief, wanted some of that belief for themselves.

Written by James Bailey

September 11, 2018 at 2:40 pm

Took our jobs, took our businesses? American entrepreneurs and immigration.

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Just about everyone has heard something of the debate over how immigrants affect the jobs and wages of natives. The general consensus in economics is that immigration has neutral to positive effects on the average native. This can happen because immigrants aren’t just substitutes for the native labor supply- they can also be complements for native labor, and their consumption increases the demand for American goods. Much ink has been spilled over the remaining contentious point of whether any major group of natives is harmed even if most Americans aren’t, with Borjas and some others finding that low skilled Americans see a slight wage decline, and Peri and others arguing they don’t.

One often-cited reason that immigration can benefit natives is that immigrant entrepreneurs start businesses that end up hiring Americans. But this point relies on one crucial assumption- that the immigrant-founded businesses aren’t simply displacing native-founded ones. While there has been a huge body of research on whether immigrants take American jobs and wages or not, there has been drastically less written on whether immigrants “take” American businesses. Perhaps immigrants willing to accept lower profits push out native businesses.

Keshar Ghimire, an economics PhD candidate at Temple University, answers the question in his innovative job market paper. A straightforward way to go about this would be to see whether states with more immigrant-founded businesses have fewer native ones. Keshar does this and finds that states with more immigrant-founded businesses actually have more native ones. But, he argues, this may simply be because some states are better for business and so attract both types of entrepreneurs, rather than immigrant entrepreneurs actually causing natives to start businesses.

To determine the real effect of immigrant businesses on native ones, he needs to find a change in the number of immigrant entrepreneurs in a state that wasn’t just caused by changing business conditions affecting everyone; it should be something that only affected immigrants. He finds such a change following the 1996 welfare reform. The national reform largely removed immigrants from eligibility for welfare. But 15 “generous” states allowed immigrants access to the new State Children’s Health Insurance Program (S-CHIP), which provides insurance for children whose families have relatively low income but who are too wealthy to qualify for Medicaid. Keshar finds that these states got a huge 22% increase in immigrant entrepreneurship. While my own work shows that health insurance isn’t always a barrier to entrepreneurship, one good study found that Medicare leads to a similar increase, so I find this plausible.

So what happened to native entrepreneurs in the 15 states that got this big influx of immigrant entrepreneurs? Keshar finds that they were not scared off. There was no change in the amount of unincorporated businesses owned by natives in these states relative to the others. The number of natives with incorporated businesses actually went up- so much that every two new immigrant businesses lead to one new native business. It turns out that just like workers, businesses can complement each other rather than only compete.

In sum, more immigrant entrepreneurship actually attracts native entrepreneurs rather than scares them away. I hope that this finding will make it in front of states considering S-CHIP eligibility, and in front of the US Congress debating immigration- especially on whether we should create a “founder visa” easing the way in for those who plan to start businesses, as some other countries have.

Written by James Bailey

December 17, 2015 at 1:04 pm

Regulating Away Competition

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People have long wanted to know (or thought they knew) the extent to which regulation hurts business. Diana Thomas and I tackle this question: the paper is here, or see our US News op-ed for a summary.

An even briefer summary:

New data on the Code of Federal Regulations finally allows us to figure out its impact. It looks like regulation stops potential entrepreneurs from starting new businesses, but doesn’t really drive existing firms out of business- and might actually help the biggest businesses.
Regulation is not so much govt vs business, as govt and big business vs entrepreneurs and job seekers.

Written by James Bailey

September 14, 2015 at 2:23 pm