Pursuit of Truthiness

my gut tells me I know economics

Archive for the ‘Data’ Category

The US Spends 3x the OECD average on Outpatient Care

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You’ve probably heard that the US spends twice what other rich countries do on health care, and this is true. But we actually spend a normal amount on inpatient and long-term care, while spending more than three times as much as other rich countries do on outpatient care: 7.5% of GDP for the US vs 2.5% for the average OECD country. In fact, we spend more than twice as much as the next-highest-spending countries, Portugal and Switzerland, which each spend 3.5% of GDP on outpatient care.

I’m working on a book that will explore why we spend so much.

OECDoutpatientSpending

Source: OECD Health Statistics 2015

 

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Craft-Beer-O-Nomics

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A new article in the Journal of Wine Economics gives an informative and interesting history of beer in the United States, with a special focus on craft beer. While they do some statistical analysis at the end, most of the article tells a story that everyone should be able to understand. I could give you the basics of the story but I think their graphs do that best:

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We have gone from the dark ages of 1979 when Americans only drank Bud and Miller to the amazing variety of beer available today. Check out the article for stories of the people behind the craft beer revolution, and for an attempt to explain why it happened and why it happened in the states where it did.

Written by James Bailey

January 6, 2016 at 4:37 pm

Physicians Per Capita by State Multiyear Panel Data

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I was recently trying to get data on the number of physicians in each state for a paper I’m doing on the politics of health insurance mandates. I found that this data was very easy to find for a single year (lots of popular articles and sites) or a few years (Statistical Abstract of the US and the CDC), but hard to find for every year in a multiyear panel. It turns out that the answer is the Area Resource File from the Department of Health and Human Services, which has data from 1995 to 2011 (except 2009, because that would be too easy).

I hope this post will save someone from spending over an hour Googleing, as I just did.